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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the studio in chicago, two days after the election, i asked cornell west and tavis smiley about the reelection of president obama. i asked them about the fact we are in the president city. he had just flown out the day before and what this next four years means. >> it is morally obscene and spiritually profane to spend billions of dollars on the elections and not have any serious discussion on poverty, trade unions being pushed against the wall, declining wages, the 1% signer doing very well. no talk about drones, dropping bombs on innocent people. we end up with such a truncated discourse as a major problems, ecological catastrophe, climate change, global warming. it was very sad. i'm glad there was not a right- wing takeover, but we in up with the republican rockefeller in black face with barack obama. so that our struggle intensifies. >> that is a pretty rough assessment of president obama. >> that is what we have. richard nixon is to the left of him on health care. richard nixon is to the left of him on guaranteed income and the same policies in terms of imperial foreign pol
from that guy. i think they won in a low turn in elections in wisconsin. i think everybody should run now. go into elections where there's a lot of voters so you don't get this weird warped sense of people who supposedly represent the american electorate. that guy doesn't represent anybody. your thoughts. the current secretary of state's performance today against the performance on the side of the right. >> he was so overmatched, ron johnson. he opened questions by saying it could have been taken a very simple phone call to ascertain the truth. my god, did he look at the pictures of that carnage? nothing was very simple. he proved he's very simple. his questions were disrespectful and i was thrilled that she got angry at him. women are sometimes told never to get emotional or angry. she did both. she choked up a bit in her introduction and got angry at ron johnson as she should. she lectured rand paul. on had i been president, you would have been fired. >> to consider the prospect of rand paul. but he's got none. >> he has a healthy imagination. >> you mentioned compassion and feeling
approval rating in a while. this is the natural ebb and flow. it usually builds up after winning re-election. there are a lot of things in the agenda space. you pay off a limited budget right? you can purchase things with that political capital. the horror of newtown is such that it has forced this issue to the foreti particularly in the wake of aurora. if you were designing the agenda in the absence of that and obviously you can't do that is this something that you want to see prioritized or are there other things you would put ahead of it? >> no. this is something that needs to be prioritized. of course the whole issue of sequestration and raising the debt ceiling limit, getting the budget under control, are probably our highest priority at this point in time. we should be meeting four and five days a week in committee doing the job that we were elected to do and the republican leadership has not set a schedule that we can do that. the whole gun control issue has been on the front pages now for decades and the democrats, republicans, none of us have really done anything about it. so i thin
represented for our community in terms of a step forward. we are now elected lgbt peep to office and harvey was such an incredible trail blazer, not? in just getting elected, but in being a great leader and always holding his head high for our community. and i know when i was first sworn into office, one of the things that i always kept in mind was something that i understand harvey to have said, * that when you go into city hall, you walk up the central staircase. you don't walk on one of the side staircases because for our community, it is so important for us to walk up that central staircase and for us to be in the middle of everything and for everyone to know that we are here. and all these years later, we've made a lot of strides in the lgbt community, but we still have so much work to do around hiv issues, around our youth, around discrimination, around transinclusion, and all the things that we know that harvey had he been here today would still be working on and leading on. and, so, we have to keep doing our work. and frankly, we can't take for granted that queer people are going t
. >> brown: then, from tel aviv, margaret warner reports on the israeli elections, as prime minister benjamin netanyahu's party was on track to stay in power by a narrow margin. netanyahu tries to put together, it's sure to include new faces and new agendas that will influence the country. >> ifill: we examine a new study on concussions, showing the impact of hard hits on the brains of living but retired n.f.l. players. >> i go through stages where i think how come i can't remember that and i always wondered are these age-related or are they conclusion related? >> brown: and we mark the 40th anniversary of the "roe v. wade" decision by the supreme court, with a look at the strategies of abortion rights advocates and opponents. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only a river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world. and perhaps even yourself. viking river cruises. exploring the world in comfort. >> bnsf railway.
that republicans should whine about. he did win the election he's entitled to try this very liberal strategy and see if it succeeds for him and if it's the way to get his agenda through. i tend to have my doubts. we're all going to find out. >> brown: rev. hamilton, by your role you get involved in all the social issues of our time. did you hear the president making a kind of aggressionive statement about, "this is the way forward for all of us" or did you hear him reaching out to embrace people, to help create that? >> i think it's a great question. i wish he had done more to reach out. in fact that was the point of my message today at the national cathedral was to say, you know, we need a new american vision that's not just democratic or not just republican. it has to be a new vision that brings people together. if we had a new vision with key strategic goals that republicans and democrats have crafted together and say this is what we're going to work together over the next ten years, it would have a huge impact on bringing americans together. i wish that he had done more of that >> brown:
-than-expected showing in tuesday's elections. near-final totals showed his bloc and its allies had only 60 of 120 seats in parliament. netanyahu signaled he'll reach out to a new centrist party that made a strong showing. it favors a new focus on making peace with the palestinians. this was election day in jordan. voters cast ballots in the country's first parliamentary elections since the arab spring. the new legislature will have more power, including the ability to choose the next prime minister. some two million people were eligible to go to the polls. turnout estimates varied from a high of 56% to as low as 47% as the day went on. several islamist groups boycotted, saying the election was stacked against them. but the prime minister dismissed their actions. >> ( translated ): the weakness of the turnout, if it exists, and i am not saying that, nobody should think that it is because of the boycott. it is not correct. otherwise anyone would think if there was any hesitation for the elections it's because people were neither convinced with past elections nor with the performance of the past parliamen
and bus ride. and started selling tickets before election day >> there's nothing like being here. i mean i could watch it on television or i could sit in one of the buildings around here and probably look out at it. it's nothing like being in there. kind of like swimming. you can think about the swimming but if you're not in the pool you really can't feel it. >> suarez: for many we spoke to, it wasn't just history but this president that brought them to washington >> we don't think we've had a president like him before or will have one in my lifetime. so it's worth it to be here to pay homage to him and to his beautiful family and to the country that elected him and to the people who elected him. we're just delighted to be a part of this. >> this is history in the making. first of all from an historical perspective who wouldn't want to be here? but more importantly for me, the whole of the obama administration is everything that i hold dear >> suarez: margaret came up with her family from north carolina. for her a second inauguration for the first black president was no less exciting, no l
be more tkeufpbt it turned out t difficult it turned out to be. it was a narrow election. he has that ahead of him. not to mention the things that haunt a second term which none of us can imagine today. >> you can see former president clinton and secretary of state clinton. who is going to be testifying before congress in a less friendly atmosphere later this week. i was reading obama's first inaugural address today, because i thought, you know, let's get a sense of what it is that he said four years ago. i want to read you two lines. on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and falls promises the recriminations and warn out doug mas that for far too long have strangled our politics. that is an incomplete at best. not all the president's fault but also counterparts on capitol hill. but we are still strangled by that kind of division. talking about national security and the global war on terror, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. that was part of the promise he was going to make to shut down guantanamo, to end enhanced interrogat
with everything even though they have a bad rating, it doesn't affect their chance of being re-elected. unfortunately, they have been stacking in state legislatures and in the house of representatives, all of these anti-choice laws that are every egregious wiggle they can come in. none of them, by the way would stand up against roe v. wade because there are so many price of concerns in the fetal heart beat bill. they're adding things like she has to be taped listening to it. the fact she's in the office being scrutinized or filmed while she's getting a medical procedure or -- >> it is a violation of privacy. >> hal: it is absurd. >> they do things even so much as -- i don't know if it's law necessarily or if it's just the doctor's preference to find out how far along the woman is but they'll have you get a sonogram and that can be traumatic. >> yeah. >> just making that decision, having to see what is growing at that moment can be traumatic for a woman. unless you're in that position, it is inappropriate for someone to make that change on your behalf. >> hal: i believe that to be the g
of the strength of how his legacy will continue it will actually be the 2016 election that will tell us. if you look at history only if a person of the same party is elected after that to turn president that the policies of that present a continue to get in grain and truly part of the cultural fabric. the republican is elected in 2016 you will see some dismantling of certain things. the saw with george bush after ronald reagan. it does not happen very often in history. there's not much of a crowd left at all. matter where you figure in politically you cannot argue that president obama is an incredible writer an incredible speaker. very much appreciated around these parts. folks now moving on to the next stage of this. it is along pennsylvania avenue. the parade they're looking forward to. the first family finishes that quick lunch. about 45 minutes. all of that food that is making me so hungry earlier in our coverage. they arrived very early this morning. kind of like we did here at the national mall for our coverage. they brought along with them some young people from around chicago. that is
are not about him. >> what we're celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president. we're doing celebrate aring each other. >> reporter: and he talked about the most significant of the weekend, he talks about his wife's haircut. >> i love her bangs. she looks good. she always looks good. >> reporter: and it won't end until late monday night when they attend three different ball. and more than a couple hours away before the ceremonies begin. president obama is only the 17 17th president to have a second inaugural. alternate the u.s. capitol, susan mcginnis, back to you. >> thank you so much. and of course cbs news will provide live coverage of today's inauguration festivities, it begins on cbs 5 and will run until 1 in the afternoon and no noon newscast today. cbs 5 will have reports from christin ayers in washington in the next half hour and during our 5 and 6:00 newscasts this evening. >>> it's 42 lovely degrees in washington right now. >> it's so cold there. >> chilly out there. chilly around the bay area. we have numbers around the 20s
program. president roosevelt was elected four terms. president obama got the virtue of january 20th landing on a sunday and chief justice roberts flubbing the oath in 2009. he used a note card yesterday. probably will use it today, shepard. shepard: justice sotomayor you saw. a funny story from last night. i flown in from turks and caicos for a quick vacation and taking a delta flight from kennedy. it was supposed to take off at 8:30. there were big mechanical problems. they were towing it from the gate. the toe bar got caught underneath the plane. it might have been me and my colleagues on the flight it might have stayed there. in front of me a lady was talking to the marshals as she called them if there was another way or train to get to washington. just happened it was justice sotomayor. someone from the plane said, your honor, we will get you there. and, indeed they did. justice sotomayor, to deliver the fourth inaugural swearing in today here at the capitol. doug mckelway, our correspondent from d.c. on the parade route from freedom plaza. how is the view there? >> reporter: sh
was elected to the board of supervisors in 2008 and reelected in 2010. we will get to know her and talk about the toughest issues facing the city. welcome, supervisor. thank you for joining us. let's start by talking about your background -- where you grew up, what kinds of jobs you have work. supervisor chu: my parents immigrated to the united states about 30 years ago, and i would say that is probably the most formative part of my background. growing up in an immigrant family, you learn many things. my parents raised me in southern california, and i grew up in the restaurant business. they had a small restaurant at the time, and i was there every weekend, working -- well, not working, eating. having a fried egg roll, wanton, something good. it taught me the value of working hard and what it meant to be part of a small business, a small business -- a small business, small family, and an immigrant family at that. really being impacted by the los angeles riots, when that occurred, put me on the path toward public policy and understanding what it meant to have opportunities and not have opportu
of equality and of course the election of president obama, the nation's first african american president that has to be seen as the ultimate political expression of that equality. reporting live in washington, i'm randall pinkston -- pinkston, back to you. >> how will it differ from four years ago? >> reporter: well first of all it will be a ceremonial inauguration, not the official inauguration as we have mentioned earlier on the actual date of the inauguration. it has to be on january 20. that's a sunday. the public wants to witness it themselves. it will be a second ceremonial inauguration on monday that people, they will be able to attend. >> all right, live for us in washington, enjoy the festivities, randall. >>> around here a lot warmer than what he is experiencing there in d.c. and sunny skies this weekend. >> yeah, i was there for the inauguration four years ago. >> you were in >> it was freezing. i thought it was sunny, but freezing. >> makes us feel lucky. >> yeah, kind of like the temperatures where she had this morning with a high surf
: please call the next line item. >> the clerk: line item 11. line item 10, sorry, vote to elect whether to schoas any or all discussion on item 9 held in closed session san francisco administrative code 67.12(a) action. >> second. >> all in favor. >> ayes. >> line item 11, adjournment. >> president mazzucco: so moved. all in favor. >> ayes. >> president mazzucco: thank you very much. >> hello. welcome to "meet your district supervisor." we are here with supervisor carmen chu from district four, which includes the central and outer sunset and park side neighborhood. supervisor chu was elected to the board of supervisors in 2008 and reelected in 2010. we will get to know her and talk about the toughest issues facing the city. welcome, supervisor. thank you for joining us. let's start by talking about your background -- where you grew up, what kinds of jobs you have work. supervisor chu: my parents immigrated to the united states about 30 years ago, and i would say that is probably the most formative part of my background. growing up in an immigrant family, you learn many things. my parent
election. for now, the next 18 months, obama's going to drive the agenda here in washington. this is the best time for him to get through immigration reform, gun control. this is the time for him right now -- this next year particularly is when he has the most influence that he'll have. >> do you concur with that? if you do, what does that say about the last two years of eight years for a president in the white house? >> it says a lot over the last couple of years about campaigning and doing politics, which is normal for the modern presidency. i disagree a little bit with perry. i think the president has these first 100 days. beyond that, it's dependent upon the state of the economy. that's going to be a determinate factor. >> you say 18 months. you say 100 days. you're tough. >> 100 days, then we'll see. >> there's a new political article i want to go on. it says democratic senators in red states may break with the white house. part of the quote from the article reads as follows -- senior democratic senators and aides say the president must face a stark political reality ev
, and they're not totally in love with his first term. he just beat his rival in the election. >> people have lower expectations, so i think we're going to -- he may try and raise that a little bit. this will be a lot of poetry, and the state of the union address is going to be the prose where he really lays out the agenda. >> let's bring in the auth aror the book "barack obama the story" and margaret hoover, republican consultant and cnn contributor. david, what are you expecting to hear? >> i think there's a paradox here, which is that four years ago there were huge crowds and so much ebullience of the moment. he gave such a wintry speech. today there's smaller crowds, i think he's giving a more optimistic speech. i think he feels he's in a much better place today than he was four years ago? >> cornell? >> i think we'll hear some of the things picked up from the campaign. he's got to talk about the economy, talk about the number one issue to americans, and that's jobs and expanding and growing the middle class. we're looking at a middle class that continues to shrink, and it's something tha
at the 2012 election and ahead to the inauguration with the obama campaign's internet guru, harper reed. >> we basically built what amounted to an ad-tech company, but instead of targeting ads on the internet, of course we did that, we really maximized the targeting that's physical. what that means is we're not wasting anyone's time. >> brown: and we examine the fallout from tour de france champion lance armstrong's admission that he used performance enhancing drugs. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. anby contribionso yo pbs statn from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama called today for what amounts to a national awakening to stop gun deaths in america. he detailed an action plan, all the while acknowledging that the most far-reaching measures face tough going in congress. >> we can't put this off any longer. >> su
%, not 52%, but 100%. >> oh, yes. after the election republicans were acting and talking like they understood why they got drubbed at the polls. not enough women and minority voters who here is the solution they came up with. hold a three-day retreat at a former plantation and hire a pollster to come in and train gop members on the fine points of seducing the female vote. now, for starters, they're saying rape is a four-letter word. don't say it. it's good advice, fellows. joining us, joan walsh, editor at salon.com and krystal ball host of msnbc's "the cycle." krystal, you ran for congress. did you have to be told not to talk about rape? did you have talking points on that? >> i don't recall anyone specifically sitting me down and saying don't talk about rape, but it was sort of understood. i don't think in the candidate training schools they normally have to go through, don't say rape, don't make women seem like they're sluts if they take birth control, don't call them prostitutes. >> although we're learning there are a number of efforts like this in terms of the gop candida
, the latino vote very important in getting obama re-elected, and now, you know, the event that the republican party, it seems, that they really do need to change their thinking with latinos, and the issue important to us like immigration. i am very excited about, you know, the way the country is looking at latinos and to realize that, you know, we are an important part of the society. we need to work hard to create immigration reform to help those here to definitely move up, and to become an important power in politics and sectors of the society. very exciting times. >> host: speaking of the 2012 vote and latino vote, did you vote for president obama? are you a citizen today? >> guest: i am a citizen today, yes, aam. >> host: did you support president obama for re-elect? >> guest: i did, i did, i voted for him. >> host: can you tell us why? >> guest: i voted for him because, first of all, di not like the way romney spoke about latinos, about immigrants in general, about what he wanted to do with the immigrant population. i did north support that at all, and i do think that obama is doing thin
to be one of the least-effective in this cycle. you have people like tim kaine easily winning elections in the state like virginia taking on the n.r.a. and you have michael bloomberg spending money on this and defeating a-rated n.r.a. candidates. so the whole calculus has changed. it used to be the n.r.a. was the one game in town on the money front and the pac front. that's changed. so there's a real cost now for standing with the n.r.a. and i that is as you would say a game changer in that regard. >> brown: dr. gold, how does it change your world? the evolving politics here and events like newtown? >> well, it's -- you know, from my perspective-- and i'm not a gun expert, obviously-- but from my perspective it's really unfortunate that it takes these kinds of events to move forward with our country to make a stronger commitment to providing for mental health care needs of our citizens. it shouldn't have to take something like this for something to become a social priority. >> brown: but now that it's here, as you were saying before, there's still going to be many, many questions about
an office. at the last election, one in six voters cast ballots for the far right. >> it is nice that there somewhere for people to go, a place where they can get things off their chest. >> but many people oppose the presence of the npd. one is the mayor. she has started a civic group. it all started seven years ago with a demonstration. >> the brown been for npd rubbish -- we carried one of those with us -- the brown bin. >> we want to show that we are a friendly, cosmopolitan little town, and we are not brown, right wing extremists. we are colorful and diverse. >> the npd tried to infiltrate a local sports club, but the extremists were prevented from gaining a foothold. m a three or four npd people were very active. they wanted to help, but if they get a foot in the door and a training group, that effectively makes them a trainer. and at that party office, the npd offers advice to young people, including the unemployed. the message is -- we will look after you. it is not unusual to run into the deputy leader of the national npd party here. he was convicted of hate speech for de
, and balanced peace plan that was proposed by me as the prime minister of israel. >> during the u.s. election, i was in israel last summer. mitt romney, governor mitt romney, the republican candidate, came by. it seemed to me that bebe netanyahu was essentially endorsing mr. romney's candidacy. they did a big fundraiser in israel. you were very critical of that. do you think that prime minister netanyahu was unfairly or inappropriately intervening in the u.s. election? is that why you were so critical? >> i think it was a terrible mistake. i don'i don't think that it is r duty or it is our interest to intervene in the political process in the united states. the appearance of support by netanyahu to romney, i must say i know romney very well. he's really a genuine good friend of israel and i respect him very much, but it was not for us to interfere in this process. >> you called governor romney, mr. prime minister, a good friend of israel. is barack obama a good friend of israel? >> no doubt in my mind. i was very close to president bush when he was president. we are still friends. what happens h
business. he never had a single election not even for stink -- a student council. governor? [applause] in keeping with the discussion, he is keen on innovation and things of that nature. i know that will come out. thank you, governor. >> are we all set? i am from the "mercury news," and we're here because we live in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that change affects their jobs and what they're doing to jump- start their economies which compete with one another. this could be fun. let me start with our guest. governor hickenlooper. i knew that was going to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget crisis. can you give us a quick briefing on where colorado is and what you are trying to do to turn things around? >> our budget is just as dressed as almost every state in the country. we have been working trying to control costs, get our pension fun
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)

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